Update: Hospital demolishes homes
by Denise Ellen Rizzo
Jul 02, 2014 | 6329 views | 16 16 comments | 34 34 recommendations | email to a friend | print
An empty dirt lot is left on Thursday morning after the demolition of the house at 418 Eaton Ave., across from Eaton Medical Plaza.  Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
An empty dirt lot is left on Thursday morning after the demolition of the house at 418 Eaton Ave., across from Eaton Medical Plaza. Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
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A house at 418 Eaton Ave. across from the Eaton Medical Plaza is fenced off on Thursday.  Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
A house at 418 Eaton Ave. across from the Eaton Medical Plaza is fenced off on Thursday. Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
slideshow
Three vacant houses owned by Sutter Health on West Eaton Avenue and one more on West Beverly Place are being demolished.

The buildings being torn down are at 418, 424 and 434 W. Eaton Ave. and 455 W. Beverly Place. The last is the former office of the American Medical Response ambulance company. AMR moved out in early November after being told by the property owner that the building was not structurally sound and would be condemned. According to city officials, the owner is Tracy Community Memorial Hospital Foundation.

The houses on West Eaton Avenue face Eaton Medical Plaza, 441 W. Eaton Ave., and the former AMR building is across Bessie Avenue from Sutter Tracy Community Hospital. All four were fenced off June 25.

The first houses to be demolished were 418 and 434 W. Eaton Ave., on Monday and Tuesday.

“They are fencing the properties for asbestos abatement and demolition,” Baize said. “We are in the process of doing demolition and cleanup only.”

He said the other structures will be demolished in late July.

The reason is recent vandalism, Baize said.

“They had several incidences of vandalism and some squatters,” he said. “The buildings are in disrepair and becoming a bit of a nuisance.”

The houses near the medical plaza were previously slated to be demolished to make way for a parking lot. The lot was to be used by workers at a new medical plaza that Sutter Gould Medical Foundation wanted to build to replace Eaton Medical Plaza.

The foundation controls certain assets of Sutter Health.

Building applications for the new medical plaza were denied by the Tracy Planning Commission on March 26, and Sutter Health withdrew its appeal before it went before the Tracy City Council.

Baize said that no immediate plans had been proposed for the site of the demolished buildings.

• Contact Denise Ellen Rizzo at drizzo@tracypress.com or 830-4225.

 
Comments
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newtotracy
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July 11, 2014
well that didn't take long...

Sutter is now holding a "community" meeting on 7/16 at 6 pm at the hospital in the East/West Community rooms.

apparently the area will also be addressed at a City Council meeting in August or September.

I'm betting the parking lot is back on the table in Sutter's minds!
GunslingerA10
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July 05, 2014
Big Yellow Taxi
newtotracy
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July 06, 2014
amen...
DavidinSeattle
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July 02, 2014
This especially makes me sad because it is another of my childhood memories disappearing! I'm 65 years old and I lived at the "434" W. Eaton address from kindergarden until 6th grade! My older sister Carol lived there also until she graduated from high school in the late 50's! I have so many memories in this old home! The huge back yard and basement where my Mother kept her homemade jam, jelly preserves that she made from our variety of fruit trees and her homemade canned veggies that we also grew in our backyard. We moved to the corner of Highland and East street when I entered 7th grade but my wonderful memories of this home will soon be all that's left! When they say "you can't go home"...it will soon be true for many of us ex-Tracyites! :-(
newtotracy
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July 02, 2014
what a shame...the houses would not have been "eyesores" if the hospital hadn't let them sit unoccupied for so long. instead, great examples of Craftsman architecture are now gone...I peeked in the windows of 418 Eaton not long ago (before I knew it was owned by the hospital...would've liked to buy it and make it a HOME instead of an empty lot) and the bones were there. Neat tile around the fireplace...solid wood doors (wish I coulda salvaged those)...

it's a shame we don't appreciate the history of our young nation...and those houses ARE a part of history...just as mine from 1927 is. Odds are, it'll last a lot longer than the McMansions built in the last 20 years will...it certainly has more character.

I bet once there are empty lots, the hospital will try to use that to their advantage that "they should just be paved over for parking lots anyway."
victor_jm
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July 02, 2014
History is important--and I get your nostalgia--but do we forever preserve your 1927 house for posterity? At some point, might we sensibly say good-bye to some aspects of the past, to some artifacts? Is architectural "character" dead? Aesthetic sensibility may be more about nurture than nature, so a renaissance is always possible.

me-here
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July 07, 2014
I am so sorry they did not move the houses to a new location and preserve the quality and history in those homes. There used to be a lot of that, but the new people in charge are young and have no sense of the value of preserving.
newtotracy
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July 07, 2014
haha...you make me giggle...thanks. :-)

enjoy your new home...great thing is...we have both (for now, until people who like progress for progress sake try to tear the old down) and we can both be happy.

I prefer my lathe and plaster...you prefer the drywall. awesome.

I still stand by my statement, having looked in the windows of the now gone house...it looked like the bones were there...no visible reasons to tear it down instead of fixing it for a home...but such is progress...some countries enjoy their history, ours seems to like to pave things over. c'est la vie!

and for the record...I did not refer to drywall as cardboard...merely referenced "me-here" on that one.

and you might want to refrain from going gender specific in your posts as you have ZERO idea what someone's gender is...I could be a man you know? :-)
ugogogogirl
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July 06, 2014
Lath and plaster does not bounce back after a flood it has to be removed too. They built a lot of low income homes there that were totally destroyed. Zillow will tell u here in the Stockton metropolitan area we have no ocean tsunamis and those old homes don't fare as well price in recessions.

Anyway it is made from wood slats with plaster that is very difficult to work with. I know from experience many trips to Lowes. Lead paint is a poison that if someone peels and eat has had severe effects. Mold yes most homes sit on raised floors with water problems ticking underneath. And asbestos ceilings that require the CDC to remove before removing the popcorn ceilings.

Cardboard? Really? Its called drywall lady. And mold is a problem with moisture anywhere u buy. Get rid of the moisture source to get rid of mold. That's why we don't have raised floors now.

The homeless sometimes live in cardboard homes. U live in Disney as a princess I can see.
newtotracy
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July 06, 2014
funny how after Katrina the lathe and plaster houses were the ones who bounced right back...the ones built from drywall (the cardboard in question)? mold, disintegration...you name it.

lead paint happened...don't chew on your windowsills!

no bandwagon here...I've lived in old and I've lived in new...and I'll pay extra for an old house because it'll be around longer. Better construction and better materials.
ugogogogirl
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July 05, 2014
Oh ya. Those old houses are soooo wonderful. Slat walls with lead paint and leaks broken pipes termites aluminum wires fire hazards and mold. Ya hate new homes love old homes sure why not join the bandwagon and hate on new houses.

Cardboard bad old mold good.

You Tarzan. Me Jane.

me-here
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July 03, 2014
I well remember all the promises to the Harmon Foundation for the Hospital to take possession of the Harmon Park. I don't remember any of those promises were to cement over everything.

Now, as to the 1927 homes, I have found their construction to be far better than our cardboard and glass houses of today. Not only were they warm and charming, their detail was superb. I was raised in a beautiful old home that was torn down for parking lot. I wish I had that home now.
newtotracy
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July 02, 2014
I think we're well on our way sadly...I only hope the earth can recover from the asphalt...the farmland we've covered up is too valuable to be a freaking parking lot!

and perhaps if we gravelled instead of paved...we wouldn't have such dwindling water tables...because the earth could absorb the water instead of running it out to the Bay? we'd still be in a drought...but maybe it would help. I'm pondering a gravel strip in the middle of my driveway for drainage...and tearing up as much concrete at my house as I can...replacing with brick with sand in between...
victor_jm
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July 02, 2014
Yes, perhaps our "asphalt nation" is heading down a "highway to hell."
newtotracy
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July 02, 2014
not about posterity...about taking a perfectly fixable house (from the looks) and tearing it down to leave nothing...all while lining the pockets of the lovely folks who are trying to bring us the Ellis project at great cost.

this house has been around over 80 years...and would probably last another...which I highly doubt all of those "toss em up fast" houses will do.

if there's legitimate structural issues that cannot be fixed, well I hate it but it happens. But I'm putting money on the thought that this is a ploy to force that neighborhood to allow the expansion/parking lot.

I'd love to see the numbers on how much of this country is parking lots...paved over in the name of shopping.
newtotracy
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July 07, 2014
me-here...I hear you! I do know that moving can be very cost prohibitive...especially with these in the center of town...moving power lines, closing roads...it's insane!

I just hope this isn't a ploy to get what they wanted by the hospital. :-(


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