Southside residents meet with city staff on code enforcement issues
by Michael Langley
Feb 28, 2014 | 6130 views | 9 9 comments | 77 77 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Hayward Lewis (left), a Tracy code enforcement officer, Kuldeep Sharma, city engineer and David Ferguson, public works director talk with Southside resident Lisa Di Pasquale about issues with properties near her home during a meeting on Friday at city hall.  Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
Hayward Lewis (left), a Tracy code enforcement officer, Kuldeep Sharma, city engineer and David Ferguson, public works director talk with Southside resident Lisa Di Pasquale about issues with properties near her home during a meeting on Friday at city hall. Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
slideshow
David Ferguson, Tracy public works director takes notes while Southside resident Lisa Di Pasquale discusses issues with properties near her home during a meeting on Friday at city hall.  Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
David Ferguson, Tracy public works director takes notes while Southside resident Lisa Di Pasquale discusses issues with properties near her home during a meeting on Friday at city hall. Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
slideshow
Two women concerned with the state of the neighborhoods in Tracy’s Southside area met Friday with Public Works Director David Ferguson, city engineer Kuldeep Sharma and code enforcement officer Hayward Lewis to discuss code enforcement issues.

Residents Lisa Di Pasquale and Josie Lopez told the city staff about trash, abandoned shopping carts, graffiti, derelict homes and other issues they say people who live in Southside deal with every day.

“What we’d like for our neighborhood is to be put on the radar,” Di Pasquale said. “Our area just seems to be a magnet (for code violations) and I would appreciate if we could be on a regular visit (schedule) rather than us having to call all the time.”

Di Pasquale and Lopez, along with seven other residents, went before the city council Jan. 21 to ask the city for help. (Previous story)

Lopez, who has lived in her South Street home since 1940, said in an interview Jan. 24 that she just wants help from the city to keep her neighborhood clean.

“Every year I call the city about certain things and I never get anybody on the phone,” Lopez said. “I leave a message and once in a great while they will get back to me but most of the time they don’t.”

The day before the Friday meeting, City Manager Leon Churchill met with Di Pasquale and walked through Southside to discuss city policy issues related to the needs of residents there.

The city council is due to discuss whether to put those policy issues on a future agenda during their regular meeting Tuesday.

• Contact Michael Ellis Langley at mlangley@tracypress.com or 830.2431.
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patRobertsen
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March 04, 2014
Residents Lisa Di Pasquale and Josie Lopez told the city staff about trash, abandoned shopping carts, graffiti, derelict homes and other issues they say people who live in Southside deal with every day.

You mean it was left there by people who live in the SouthSide? In neighborhoods I used to live in when people leave shopping carts someone pushed the shopping cart on their front lawn. After this happening a few times, they soon got the message.

Sometimes it takes neighbors who actually care about their neighborhood and aren't going to put up with neighborhood shuttle service for the shopping carts. You get fed up with calling the grocery store just push it back to their yard.
newtotracy
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March 02, 2014
abandoned shopping carts are a huge annoyance to me. a) it's theft...and in some cases it's felony theft because of the cost of the carts to the stores and b) if you need to steal a cart...use it and return it! most of these folks tend to take a cart...ditch it and go steal another one the next day!

as for how to return these? don't...report them. There are businesses that are around JUST to pick them up...and it works. I've used them...we had some charming folks in the neighborhood who did the daily theft thing...it looked like a 99 Cent Store parking lot around here. Started calling in...and suddenly not only were they gone, but the company started cruising the area because they realized it was a cash cow!

here's where to go:

http://www.cartretrieval.net/

super easy and you can do it even if you go out of your neighborhood.

It takes all of us...the city needs to fulfill it's end of the bargain, but so do residents. If you rely on your neighbors or the city to do the work...then be prepared to be disappointed.
AAverill
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March 01, 2014
I wonder if we could band together to make some of these changes ourselves. I live in this area and on many occasions am tempted to return a shopping cart but do not have the means. Could we have "citizen clean-up days" maybe? Where we get together and make the changes that are so desperately needed. Maybe if we put forth the effort and draw attention to the area in a positive way there would be a influx of funds to do additional improvements. I say its worth a try.
rayderfan
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March 02, 2014
AAverill that's a good idea.

Here's another good idea. Maybe we should all stop depending on Tracy City Government to take care of our every need. A good example is just what you suggest AAverill. If the neighbors in the South Side get together and organize an effort to clean up their area then there would be no need for the city to get involved.

Then maybe our taxes would start to go down because we don't demand so much help from the city and they can begin to reduce their staff levels.

The reason we pay so much in taxes is not because the city demands it; It's because we have become so dependent on city government to do everything for us and therefore they demand more money for more people to do more things that we demand.

Get the picture.

I'm just saying; If we want to reduce our taxes and restrict people like Churchill, Ives, Maciel and the rest from misusing our taxes we need to stop demanding so much from our government and start doing some things for ourselves.
victor_jm
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March 05, 2014
Not always, but typically, neighbors who are inclined to organize for a cleaner and safer neighborhood are the ones who aren't responsible for the squalor and dangers.

I step outside my front door every day and pick-up garbage, not just in front of my property, but in front of properties nearest mine. I have talked with a few neighbors about metaphysics, specifically, aesthetics, but many of us are unable to connect the dots.

Guess what? Many people are unbothered by the squalor they live in. Many people don't feel as if they need to return a shopping cart to a shopping stall (and this attitude is evident in every retail parking lot). Many people don't mind dumping dogs in their backyards. Many people don't mind infringing on your tranquility. Sometimes I tire of being "chewed out" by an adult (?) who says, "Mind your own business."

I keep trying. Remember, "We decide which animals may live in luxury and which animals will die in squalor."

Keep feeding the cows to the dogs.
rayderfan
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March 07, 2014
I understand victor_jm. Sounds to me like you're trying to help by doing your part. It's unfortunate that not many others are doing the same.
Ornley_Gumfudgen
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March 07, 2014
AAverill

Interestin an I do mostly agree. Fer me it all starts out with what "you" (meanin me) do. Whair ta start? Do ya gotta wait fer others ta join in or should ya start out by yerself an hope others join it?

Perhaps th lesson taught by Christ regardin th Good Samaritan applies best here. I believe it does but that's just me an God gives all th right ta believe as they desire.

If ya recall, all th "good" people were too "good" ta help th man who had been beaten, robbed an left on th side of th road. It was th Samaritan who obviously didn't care what people thought of him, his self worth or th worth of someone in need of help, who reached out an helped th man.

When lookin at th us against them mentality, whair th so called "good" actually look down on those who live in different conditions thair are remarkable similarities between our society taday an th society th proud Jews durin Christ's time.

Here it seems ta be th "South Side" versus th rest of Tracy. But exactly whair does that South Side start an end? Is it all land South of th Bow Tie area? Or is it just th area layin South of th Bow tie West ta Tracy Blvd, south ta Mt. Oso an east ta th railroad tracks?
Ornley_Gumfudgen
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March 07, 2014
So whair does it all start? Does it start with a community of citizens bandin tagether ta help out those who are not as financially well off, have good payin jobs an steller educations, or does it take one individual ta simply make a start by putting his own self interests aside an helpin someone else in need?

I believe thatf ya study an truly comprehend th lesson Christ was teachin in th story of th Good Samaritan ya will see th answer. An that answer ain’t just fer you but fer everyone, especially those who exalt themselves as bein too good or to busy ta help anyone else much less those livin in different areas with different social values.

Th “us against them” mentality, in my opinion, is th primary reason why most people don’t get involved as ya seem ta indicate ya might like ta.

behonestguys
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March 01, 2014
A few council meetings ago, I remember that local attorney, Nicolaw, asking the Council to take the $450k they voted a few years ago to re-name Naglee Road to Auto Mall Parkway (still not done), and use it instead to help improve the Southside. He said we need to "put people over profits". I hope the Council considers that proposal when they talk about making the Southside a safe and decent place for its residents.


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