Plane accident closes runway at Tracy Airport
by TP staff
Jan 03, 2014 | 10249 views | 19 19 comments | 41 41 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Beechcraft damaged in accident
The pilot of a single engine Beechcraft Bonanza was uninjured when the airplane sped out of control across the Tracy Municipal Airport ramp toward Runway 26 collapsing the landing gear on Friday, Jan. 3.  Glenn Moore/Tracy Press
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The Federal Aviation Administration will take no further action to investigate an incident at the Tracy Municipal Airport Friday, Jan. 3, which left an aircraft wrecked and a taxiway scarred.

The accident, just before 10:30 a.m., shut down Runway 26 at the airport, 5749 S. Tracy Blvd.

Airport coordinator Bruce Ludeman said Friday, the unidentified pilot had started his single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza on the ramp just south of the main hangar when it sped out of control and rolled north into a dirt area between the ramp and the taxiway for Runway 26.

The front landing gear collapsed just before the plane reached the taxiway for the runway. The plane, still under power, crossed the taxiway, leaving a shallow furrow in the pavement, and finally came to a stop in the unpaved area between the taxiway and runway, roughly a quarter mile from its original position.

Airport staff drove out to the plane’s final resting place to help the pilot, who Ludeman said is from the Bay Area and renting a hanger at the airport, stop the engine. The pilot was in the plane the whole time and is uninjured.

Ludeman said in an interview Wednesday, Jan. 8, the furrow did not pose a safety hazard and airport staff used a blower to push all of the pieces of asphalt off the taxiway. The taxiway and runway 26 were reopened soon after the incident.

The airport coordinator added Wednesday that an inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration had visited the scene and determined no further investigation was necessary.

• Contact the Tracy Press at 835-3030 or tpnews@tracypress.com.

 

Comments
(19)
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Sneaky
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January 16, 2014
Unfortunately most human beings, myself included, have a relatively poor ability to gauge relative risk. Those who worry about the safety of neighborhoods around airports live every day with far larger risks yet oddly don't worry about them. I would bet a hefty chuck of change that there have been far more car crashes within a mile radius of the airport than there have been plane crashes. I would also bet that far more folks died relatively young of cancer or heart disease within a mile of the airport than died in plane crashes. Somehow though folks get all worried about the airplanes while they eat their McDonalds and drive while talking on their cell phones. The surrounding area is probably safer with the airport present than it would be if the airport were replaced by a bunch of homes. The safety of surrounding neighborhoods is not a good argument for closing it. I wish it would close too but for reasons other than a false sense of safety.
Beech-craft
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January 09, 2014
Close the airport or get Nikalaw and SkyView out of there.

I believe the airport is in worst shape ever because of them.

SkyView, do the right thing. Step down and move on.
Rudy_Santos
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January 06, 2014
Shut down the airport problem solved!
fortheunderdog
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January 05, 2014
This article has nothing to do with Serpa or Surland.

It sounds to me this story is the same as a person starting their car and letting it idle while they run back inside to grab a cup of coffee. Vehicle slips into gear and crashes causing damage. Nothing more.
me-here
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January 06, 2014
4theunderdog: Yah, anything concerning the airport seems to include Serpa/Surland. Any accident at or around the airport could affect any planned construction of home in that area.

No other builder seems to want to build there..for good reasons.

Serpa, go build homes somewhere else. Please.
Beech-craft
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January 09, 2014
To me-here: You may want to read an earlier comment by TracyFlyBoy. He stated that there is already a concrete factory at the end of the runway.

Also, there is already a housing development and several other businesses at the end of the runway.

More importantly, there is already a development with a pool at the end of the runway.

And honestly. Tracy Hills is very near there. And nobody complains about Tracy Hills who will benefit from infrastructure at Ellis since Lammers will extend to Tracy Hills.

It may interest you to know that more development west of the runway would help the airport by reducing the winds on the runway.

At the airport there are no homes west where most of the wind comes from. This wind is challenging while the plane is gaining lift at slow runway speeds.

I see the same thing while planes are tossed around at the east end of the runway on entry to the airport runway.

More importantly, the airport should either:

A.) be closed, because it is losing money.

B.) convert to a boutique airport and open the restaurant they promised 10 yrs. ago or replace SkyView Avation with someone who can deliver a boutique airport restaurant, on par with 4 Corners restaurant, or give it a rest at city meetins.
TracyFlyBoy
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January 05, 2014
This is a serious accident and a life could have been lost. Luckily, only a few beers were spilled and there nothing the insurance company and drycleaner can't handle. What I want to know is:

1) Who was the pilot? Was there alcohol involved? I hope Mr. Nicalow looks into this!!

2) Is there a police report or is the "TAA" overseeing this party-foul?

3) Who is going to pay to repair runway 26 and the taxiway?



Beech-craft
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January 09, 2014
The TAA is a joke. Surland was paying for the fuel bills the fuel company owes until Nicalow went to the TAA and asked if he could use the receipt as a prop at a recent city meetin - to put a stop to Surland paying taxes. Now the airport is broke and the runway needs repaired and the TAA will ask the taxpayers to foot the bill again.

In a recent response, Nicalow said he is just a "country lawyer" who "breaks bread" with Serpa. I think he's more interested in breaking the city koffers.
Ornley_Gumfudgen
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January 05, 2014
me-here

Ta answer yer question. No! But I do see what happens when ya make a stupid comment an use it ta attack someone who don't subscribe ta his personal philosophy.

Takin a taxi accident of an aircraft on th ground an extrapolatin it inta a downed aircraft accident off th end of a runway is a bit of a stretch.

If ya ain't guessed it, I totally agree with Tracyite4Life on this one.

I can only suppose if, God forbid, an aircraft burst's inta flames while sitting in it's hanger ya'd attempt ta hold Serpa accountable fer it. Either that or it's George Bush's fault. Same thang really.
behonestguys
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January 04, 2014
And the City wants to let Serpa build a bunch of houses at the end of the airport runway?
Tracyite4life
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January 04, 2014
Yeah, the plane wasn't even in the air. Do you also object to putting homes at the end of roads? Other vehicles going fast might also drive into them there.

Nice try. If you hate a guy at least have the ---- to call him out personally. Don't hide in the forums trying to cast rocks from a story that has nothing to do with your political agenda.

Geez.

me-here
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January 04, 2014
See what you get for saying anything negative about Serpa or Surland.....even when as obvious as an airport runway mishap. They will find a way to excuse him even if a plane dumps on top of a house....
TracyFlyBoy
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January 05, 2014
behonestguys, take a trip to the airport sometime. Luckily there is a block factory at the end of the runway that should protect any new homes from pilot error.
Beech-craft
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January 09, 2014
Why would a plane dump on a house, me-here?

As you should know if you sat in any city meetins, the planes veer off to the west straight into the headwinds.

The airport has history of plane incidents. Here goes. One ended up in a tree several counties away. One ended up in Central Valley city, miles away. Another landed on the water canal service roads which there are plenty of west of the airport.

And finally SkyView's own Airport Manager drove his BMW into the water canal at the end of the runway killing an airport customer after a birthday bash - joyride down the runway.

Yeah, we are really at risk of falling asteroids too. Ok.

Here's a suggestion. Make the airport a boutique airport and never land a 747 there.

Problem solved.

mrmnfallacy
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January 03, 2014
Holy cow...I hope this pilot has a little money left over after the holidays to cover repairs including FAA mandated tear down and rebuild of his engine due to prop strike. About $50K - $75K should cover it and needed repairs.

As the old saying goes...if you want to build a small fortune in aviation, start with a large one
mdsmith17
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January 03, 2014
That's what you buy insurance for. He's only out his deductible. Of course they may total out his plane too.
Beech-craft
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January 09, 2014
1/3 1845Z (1045 local): A Be36 struck a parked aircraft at Tracy, California. No one was hurt. The Bonanza damage was not reported, and there is no report on the condition of the other aircraft. N7833R (E-130) is a 1968 Beech 36 registered in Wichita, Kansas.

("Taxi into obstacle/parked aircraft"; "Substantial damage"--an insurance industry report states: "After startup, the airplane sped up, sustaining a front and right main landing gear collapse when still under power, crossed the taxiway, leaving a shallow furrow in the pavement, and finally came to a stop in the unpaved area between the taxiway and runway 26, roughly a quarter mile from its original position. The aircraft, a Beech 36 Bonanza, sustained substantial damage and the sole pilot onboard was not injured."

This does not sound like an airplane that was occupied by the pilot at the time of its quarter-mile jaunt across the airport. There is no mention of another aircraft in the insurance report, despite such a statement in the FAA preliminary. Was this perhaps an attempt at a "hand-propping" ?)

Beech-craft
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January 09, 2014
http://www.eaa.org/intheloop/articles/1006_safety.asp

Beech-craft
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January 09, 2014
Hand Propping

It’s Dangerous

Hand propping an airplane may be seen as a nostalgic throwback to the days when airplanes had no electric systems, and by necessity, needed a hand getting started. Make no mistake about it – hand propping is extremely dangerous and should only be attempted after having competent instruction from someone qualified to teach you.

If the first time you attempt to hand prop your airplane is after a weak start attempt and a dead battery, you’re setting yourself up for disaster. The next two videos demonstrate just how much trouble you could get yourself in.

The first video shows an airplane spinning around on its main gear after the hapless pilot set the throttle too high with a first-time passenger on board. He got it started all right, but it didn’t end too well. Here’s a link to the National Transportation Safety Board report on the incident: www.NTSB.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=18883&key=0.



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