Your Voice: Just vote no
by Mel Dumas, Tracy
Oct 25, 2012 | 3086 views | 9 9 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
EDITOR,

California isn’t just broke — it is billions in the hole. The state has the third-highest income tax, the highest sales tax and the highest gas tax in the country, and Gov. Jerry Brown is pushing for more tax increases. Businesses and middle class people are leaving California in record numbers because of over-taxation and over-regulation. Economic analysts say overspending by incompetent politicians is the cause of California’s fiasco.

We have a governor who has approved the bullet train to nowhere at a cost of upwards of $100 billion with interest and overruns, which will happen with what goes on in the state government.

Gov. “Moonbeam” Brown wants to increase the sales tax and the upper tax on individuals for his out-of-touch ideas — he thinks this will help balance the deficit. All he wants to do is increase the amount of money collected so he can promote his agenda and keep on spending. This is not a plan for fiscal discipline, it’s another attempt for the liberal state Assembly to keep up its spending, which is out of control.

I urge everyone to vote no on any ballot measure to increase the amount of money to the state, for any reason. Let them work with what we have, and let them make the tough decisions they should have made years ago. This is not a problem the people of this state made. It’s the politicians who think we are so stupid that they can strap the California residents every time there is a fiscal issue they do not want to deal with. Vote no on all money issues this election.

Comments
(9)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
RedHotChilliPeppers
|
November 03, 2012
Did Jerry Brown give a tax break to corporations, who did not bring jobs to California, only to support raising the citizen's taxes who are left underemployed, while corporations are leaving California anyway?
behonestguys
|
October 28, 2012
There's an old Italian saying; "the fish always rots from the head". Translation - the corruption always starts at the top and works its way down. Unfortunately, we have become some enamored by the concept of self-entitlement that our politicians have dished out to get elected and re-elected, that we have forgotten what made our Republic great - the concept of self-reliance, thrift and hard work. The only chance we have to rid ourselves of this dependency is by choking off the money to the pandering politicians that makes this possible - No on 30 and 38.
Moravecglobal
|
October 26, 2012
“All you have to do is spend more (Prop 30, 38) on education” should be ignored as Prop 30, 38 do not serve our state’s school and university children. Additional money (Prop 30, 38) is not the magic elixir. We are kidding ourselves by believing that education funding shortfalls disappear with Prop 30, Prop 38.

Prop 30, Prop 38 levy significant taxes on each one of us. The wounds that Prop 30, 38 are to heal have been self inflicted largely by our elected Sacramento politicians who simply do not say no to any influential interest group be they teachers, University of California (29% increase in salaries last 6 years), public employees, Best Hope to Fix California Education: teacher faculty never-say-die spirit of more learning for fewer business, or other unions or lobbyists.

As election day approaches Prop 30, 38 are used by Sacramento politicians and lobbyists to blackmail us.

Vote No on Prop 30, 38, 32. Save California education for our school and university children.

Macpup
|
October 26, 2012
Prop 30 is touted as being locked so the money collected can only be used for schools BUT what happens to the money already budgeted for schools? It does not have that lock, so it can be put back into the general fund; therefore, the schools will not receive any additional money.



In 1988, California passed Proposition 98 (which provided K-14 schools with a guaranteed funding source that grows each year with the economy and the number of students. The guaranteed funding is provided through a combination of state General Fund and local property tax revenues) BUT there was a caveat to that too - the Governor could declare a fiscal emergency and void the Proposition - which was promptly done.



What is different now? Nothing - we are worse off now than in 1988! Vote to stop the spending and for representatives that will stop the spending!
Ornley_Gumfudgen
|
October 26, 2012
Macpup

I don't really thank thair is much difference than whair we were in 1988 an while I somewhat agree with yer comment I won't go so fer as ta say "stop the spending," but would rather say, "we need to have more judicious an appropriate spendin instead of wastin th few dollars we have on thangs that are really a waste of time an money."

Say, didn't we all pass a lottery law some years back that allegedly promised it was gonna solve all th financial problems of our schools? That didn't seem ta work out all that well? Whare did that money go?
backinblack
|
October 26, 2012
While I agree with the main point of Mel's letter I disagree with his opinion on who's to blame. It's not the politicians, it's we the people. We the people put Pelosi, Boxer, Brown, Barbara Lee, and Obama in office.

This is what happens when the republic becomes permeated with more takers than earners, more people who know more about the life of Kim Kardashian than George Washington, and more people who know what time some idiot housewife show is on but can't name the year we declared our independence.
Ornley_Gumfudgen
|
October 26, 2012
BIB

Well said, I completely agree. And if th folks in Tracy don't like th current lineup of council members th same applies. Th politicians are gonna do what politicians do. If ya don't like what thair doin then replace em. But apparently, because of th way th council is currently made up, most people like th current set as they elected em an or re-elected em. Are they wrong? Perhaps frum th individualistic perspective but frum th local representative government perspective they are doin what th majority of th folks elected em ta do.

Fer instance, someone says that a politician lies a based on thair perspective he or she did. But based on th politician's, an th rest who apparently support him or her, th statement wasn't a lie.

Who's ta tell? How do ya decide? Do ya decide one is right an one is wrong based on th unproven statements of others or do ya look at all of it through yer own eyes and then make up yer own mind.

Seems ta me if yer somewhat perplexed about a comment a politician made that instead of comin out swingin an callin em a liar ya might ask em ta explain what they meant when they made th statement.

Cont

Ornley_Gumfudgen
|
October 26, 2012
Cont

People often say one thang an then later, either because of reflection on what they said or th parameters of what they commented on have changed. Does that make em liars?

Hope not because if it does then virtually all women an men are liars because people frequently change thair minds on thangs.

Not always but usually when a two way dialogue has been conducted an explanations as ta what was said an why, ya find out it was a misunderstandin an not really a lie in th first place.

Alas, many of us, myself included, are somewhat guilty of condemnin someone without totally understandin all of th facts of th matter. That's a kangaroo court type of justice that really isn't so much interested at gettin th truth than it is in simply eliminatin th person we don't like at th time.
victor_jm
|
October 31, 2012
BackinBlack,

I recently completed reading Folks, This Ain’t Normal by Joel Salatin. The following is an excerpt from this publication with parenthetical comments supplied by me. He is discussing our consumption of foods we can’t make in our kitchens. I thought his observation serves as a metaphor for many facets of our culture.

These huge food processing facilities (for example, entertainment industries) where everything goes through miles of stainless steel and cooling towers are not the friend of an empowered food (art) proletariat. They (such as American Idol) are the monuments to an elitist hierarchy that wants ignorant (unimaginative) consumers (spectators), an industrial-dependent class (fanatics) too afraid (indolent) and too confused (myopic) to discover (develop and experience) the joy and taste of their own kitchen (efforts).

Mel’s observation is too simplistic.



We encourage readers to share online comments in this forum, but please keep them respectful and constructive. This is not a space for personal attacks, libelous statements, profanity or racist slurs. Comments that stray from the topic of the story or are found to contain abusive language are subject to removal at the Press’ discretion, and the writer responsible will be subject to being blocked from making further comments and have their past comments deleted. Readers may report inappropriate comments by e-mailing the editor at tpnews@tracypress.com.